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Trostle Barn
McPherson Barn
McPherson Barn
Trostle Barn
STRUCTURES LOCATED WITHIN THE NATIONAL PARK
Michael Bushman Farm. (July '99)  Original house and barn which stood at the time of the battle, located at the intersection of the Emmitsburg Rd. and South Confederate Ave.   
Lydia Leister Farm.  Located on the Taneytown Road just south of the National Park Service visitor center and Cyclorama, owned at the time of the battle (along with 9 acres of land)  by Lydia Leister, widow and mother of six children.  When the battle erupted, Leister left her home and sought shelter with relatives who resided on the Baltimore Pike.  Union General Meade used her house as his headquarters, and it was here on the evening of July 2nd that he held a council of war with his generals..  The house also served as a hospital site.  Post battle photographs show dead horses scattered in the yard near the house and barn.  Leister received no compensation for the damage done to her property, but managed to prosper following the war, purchasing 7 more acres of land in 1868, and building an addition onto the house in 1874.  In 1888, Lydia sold the farm to the Gettysburg Battlefield Memorial Association.  She died in 1893.
1. View looking west towards the Taneytown Road. (March '00)   2. Front of the house.  (March '00)
Edward McPherson Farm. Located on the Chambersburg Pike (Route 30 West) at McPherson's Ridge.  The barn is the only structure which remains today.  Occupied by tenant John Slentz and his family at the time of the battle.  McPherson was a journalist, elected to the US House of Representatives, and at the time of the battle was deputy commissioner of internal revenue, having been appointed to that post by President Lincoln.  On July 1st Slentz, along with his wife and five children, fled the farm and took shelter in the basement of the Lutheran Seminary.  Following the days fighting, the farm became the Union 1st Corps field hospital.
1. View from Buford Statue. (Sept. '98)  2. Close view from the west. (Feb. '99) 3. View from Reynolds Ave. (Sept. '98)
4View from Stone Ave. (Dec. '99)   5. Hospital Sign along Stone Avenue. (Dec. '99)
George Rose Farm.  236 acre farm located east of the Emmitsburg Road, south of the Peach Orchard.  Scene of heavy fighting on the second day of the battle; a large number of Confederate soldiers fell and were buried around the house & barn.  The original house still stands today, but all that remains of the barn is the stone foundation - it burned after being struck by lightning in the 1910.  A famous set of photos was taken on the Rose Farm by Alexander Gardner just days after the battle, which include a group of dead Confederate soldiers.  More information about these photos can be found in William A. Frassanito's Early Photography at Gettysburg.
1. View from Brooke Ave. (Dec. '98)   2Split rock located in the Rose Woods, featured prominently in the Gardner photo series. (Dec. '98)
Abraham Trostle Farm.  135 acre farm located on United States Avenue.  Original house and barn still exist.  The barn still bears a scar of the battle - a hole near the roofline through which a cannon ball pased.  Along the road in front of the house stands a monument for the 9th Massachusetts Battery, which had retreated to this point from its original position along the Wheatfield Road during the fighting on July 2nd.   The battery stood its ground here, allowing other units to retreat safely back towards Seminary Ridge.  Timothy O'Sullivan's famous photos show the many dead horses that lay near the house & barn.  Also located near the barn is a marker indicating the spot where Gen. Dan Sickles was seriously wounded, requiring the amputation of his leg.
1. View of the barn from the southwest. (Sept. '98)
STRUCTURES LOCATED OUTSIDE THE NATIONAL PARK
The Dobbin House (Steinwehr Ave.) decorated for Christmas, December 1999.  The Alexander Dobbin House is one of, if not the oldest, building standing in Gettysburg (a log home recently discovered on West Middle Street may be older). Built in 1776 by Rev. Alexander Dobbin, it was used as a stop on the Underground Railroad during the 19th century. Today it is a bed & breakfast, restaurant, colonial tavern and country craft store.  Its appearance is virtually unchanged.
1. Full view.     2. A 2nd full view.     3. 3rd full view.     4. A sleigh displayed for the Christmas season.
Evergreen Cemetery Gatehouse. Located on the Baltimore Pike on Cemetery Hill.  This historic brick structure was constructed in 1855 and was the home of caretakers Peter and Elizabeth Thorn.  Peter was serving in the 138th PA at the time of the battle;  at home with Elizabeth were her parents and three children.  Elizabeth buried over 100 soldiers after the battle - she was 6 months pregnant at the time.  Both Elizabeth & Peter are buried in Evergreen Cemetery.
1. View from East Cemetery Hill. (July '98)
John Socks (Sachs) Farm & Mill. Located near the Sachs covered bridge off of Pumping Station Rd.  Served as a field hospital.  Wounded Confederate Gen. John Hood passed through this area en route to the Plank Farm.
1Full view from side. 2Front full view.   (Dec. '99)
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